Celebrate Westernkind

Celebrate Westernkind

Westernkind has produced a rich body of work. This page serves as both a reference and celebration of Westernkind. If you think of materials that should be listed, please send an email to contact@schoolofthewest.world.

From our Community

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Motion Pictures

For The Kids

The Princess Bride (1987) – This is a romantic and swashbuckling tale of the farmboy Westley, and his struggle to free his beloved Buttercup from her planned marriage to the yucky Prince Humberdinck. [Based on the book by William Goldman. No swashes were buckled during the filming.]

The Black Stallion (1979) –   In 1946, young Alec Ramsey is shipwrecked on an island off the coast of North Africa. The only other survivor is a horse he rescues from the cargo hold. The horse learns to trust Alec, and they spend days galloping along the beach. A passing ship rescues them both, and they make their way back to America, where an ex-jockey sees the speed of the stallion and is able to enter him into a match race.  [It’s a beautifully made film with a powerful ending. Based on The Black Stallion  by Walter Farley, 1941] 

Time Bandits (1981) – Eleven year old Kevin leaves the predictable environment of his low-effort parents one night to join a group of space-time travelling dwarves (as you do). The dwarves have stolen the space-time map from the Supreme Being, in order to jump through time and space for the purposes of looting.

Popeye (1980) – Popeye lands in the coastal town of Sweethaven, in search of his father. While there he meets Olive Oyl, and adopts an orphaned baby he names Sweet Pea. Olive Oyl’s ex-boyfriend is a big meanie called Bluto. Because Bluto is so mean, he kidnaps Olive Oyl and Sweet Pea. Popeye has to track down Bluto, and duke it out.   The question is: will Popeye overcome his hatred of spinach in order to stay strong to the finish?   [Younger children will most likely love the physical humour and simple musical numbers]

Willow (1988) – The budding sorcery, Willow, undertakes a quest to find a safe home for a precious newborn, who is marked for death by an evil sorceress. Along the way, Willow learns true power doesn’t reside outside of himself, but rather that he possessed power all along.

The Never Ending Story (1984) – Upaon reading a special book “borrowed” from a used book store, ten-year-old Bastian Bux finds himself involved in a struggle to save the Childlike Empress and her land of Fantasia from The Nothing. [Based on the novel, Die unendliche Geschichte, by Michael Ende]

Labryinth (1986) – Sixteen-year-old Sarah Williams foolishly wishes her crying infant brother to be taken away by the goblins from the book she is reading. Her brother disappears and the Goblin King appears, giving Sarah 13 hours to solve his labyrinth before the brother is turned into a goblin. 

The Dark Crystal (1982) – On the planet Thra, the land was green and good until the Crystal of Truth cracked, bringing forth the evil Skeksis and the kind urRu. In an attempt to heal the Crystal, the urRu send the young gelfling, Jen, on an errand to retrieve a shard – before the planet’s three suns come into alignment, allowing the Skeksis to rule the planet forever.

The Muppet Movie (1979) – Heigh Ho, Kermit the Frog here. Kermit has several adventures with fellow muppets and movie stars, on his route from his lillypad in Florida, to his date with stardom in Hollywood.

Clash of the Titans (1981) – In an extremely complicated plot line, Perseus has many adventures in ancient Greece, battling gods and cool-looking monsters.

Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977) –  Sinbad is tasked with saving the life of his sweetheart’s brother, Prince Kassim, before he is turned permanently into a baboon by the sorceress Zenobia. Young children will enjoy the stop-motion creatures.

The Pirates of Penzance (1983) –  A nursemaid accidentally binds her charge, Frederic to a pirate (instead of a pilot) for 21 years. At the end of his apprenticeship, Frederic realizes his service to the pirate king was dishonourable, and swears to defeat the pirates that had been family to him. To complicate things further, he finds he was born on 29 Feburary of a leap year, and his contract was for 21 birthdays – thereby keeping him bound to the pirates he’s come to loath.   [Based on Gilbert and Sullivan’s 1879 opera]

The Incredibles (2004) – Bob Parr (Mr. Incredible) leaves his forced superhero retirement behind to fight against Syndrome, who’s bent on taking revenge against Mr. Incredible for rejecting Syndrome as a sidekick. Each member of the Incredible family joins in the fight; each with their own superpower.

Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987) –  The uptight Neal Page is in a hurry to get home to his family for Thanksgiving. As his travel plans continuously fall through, the bumbling, kind-hearted Del Griffith is there to annoy and befriend him every step of the way. 

The Bad News Bears (1976) – A little league baseball team is established from misfit players excluded from other teams in the league.  A drunken, selfish, ex-ballplayer is hired to coach the team, which is initially a disaster. Over the season, the players develop self-confidence and the coach finally places the emotional well being of his players above his selfish interests. The movie features strong character development and language free of “political correctness”.

Westerns

The Man From Snowy River (1982) – An absolutely brilliant tale based on Banjo Patterson’s poem. In 1880’s Australia, a young man uses his mountain-bred skills and determination to achieve a legendary ride. In the process, he proves he is no longer a boy – he is a man. 

Lonesome Dove (1989) – Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call undertake a months-long cattle drive from Texas to Montana in the 1870s. The six hour mini series features master-class acting from Robert Duval and Tommy Lee Jones.

The Searchers (1956) – Ethan Edwards (John Wayne), a Confederate veteran, searches for his niece who was abducted by Comanches.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) – Tom Doniphon (John Wayne) helps Ransom Stoddard (Jimmy Stewart) defeat Liberty Valance (Lee Marvin) and his gang in the small town of Shinbone.

True Grit (1969) – U.S. Marshal “Rooster” Cogburn (John Wayne) is hired by a young girl to seek vengeance against her father’s murderer.

The Shootist (1976) – J.B. Books (John Wayne) is an aging gunfighter diagnosed with cancer by a small town doctor (Jimmy Stewart). He passes on wisdom to a young man (Ron Howard) eager to follow in his gun-fighting profession.

The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) – Josey Wales (Clint Eastwood) takes revenge on Union troops after his family is murdered. Wales stays one step ahead of the army, as he is hunted from his home in Missouri to the southwest United States.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966) – “Blondie” (Clint Eastwood) and Tuco (Eli Wallach) search for hidden Confederate gold in New Mexico, while being dogged by the mercenary “Angel Eyes” (Lee Van Cleef). The trio eventually have the most cinematic shootout in movie history.

High Noon (1952) – A town marshal (Gary Cooper) realizes he must fight a gang of outlaws alone, as the remaining town’s citizens are too cowardly to stand up to the criminal gang.

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) – While engaged in a life-long pursuit of revenge against a man (Henry Fonda) from his youth, “Harmonica” (Charles Bronson) becomes involved in a plot to protect a homestead from a railroad baron’s hired thugs. 

European Mythos

Lord of the Rings Trilogy :The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003) – Set in the HRR Tolkien’s world of Middle-Earth, a fellowship of humans, hobbits, elf and dwarf are tasked with destroying the Ring in the fires of Mount Doom. The epic tale is replete with the European aesthetic.

Ladyhawke (1985) – The former captain of royal guard of Aquila (Italy) carries a secret curse with him. In his determination to kill the Bishop of Aquila, he enlists the help of a young pickpocket. The film features a mighty European aesthetic.  

Excalibur (1981) – This is visually the most beautiful retelling of the Arthurian legend. The story follows the story arc of King Arthur’s entire lifespan, which inludes: his parents Uther and Igraine, his mentor Merlin, his champion Lancelot, his wife Guinevere, his quest knight Percival, and his mortal enemy, Mordred. The PG version of the film is recommended for children due to violence and the Uther/Igraine baby-making scene. 

First Knight (1995) – This is a simplified version of of the Arthurian legend, focusing primarily on the complicated relationship encompassing Guinevere, Lancelot and Arthur. An important message the film delivers (towards the end) is the importance of each knight serving for the benefit of the kingdom, rather than serving for individual glory.  

Beowulf (2007) – The oldest story written in English is the poem Beowulf, about a warrior from Geatland (in Sweden) who travels to the kingdom of Hrothgar (in Denmark) to battle the half-demon Grendel. This interpretation changes a few of the details of the original poem, but stays true to the courage and valor of Beowulf.

The 13th Warrior (1999) – An Arab is sent from his kingdom to serve as ambassador to Northmen along the Volga river. When a Norse ally asks for help to stop an evil force wrecking this father’s kingdom, a seer instructs the Northmen they will succeed in defeating the evil, if they constitute a party of twelve, plus one warrior not from the North (the Arab). 

Historical -make note about Hollywood-ized version of history.

The Right Stuff (1983) – Following the plundering of Germany’s scientists, the space programs of both the US and USSR made significant advances in the “space race”. Against the backdrop of an initial Soviet lead, the film follows both the US military test pilots exploits at Edwards AFB and the rigorous training undertaken by America’s Mercury astronauts.

Master and Commander (2003) –  Demonstrating professionalism and loyalty to one’s duty, Captain Jack Aubrey and his crew are involved in a running naval battle with a French heavy frigate.  [The film is drawn from a novel series by Patrick O’Brian]

Immortal Beloved (1994) – Upon Ludwig von Beethoven’s death, his secretary and biographer investigates the composer’s life to determine the mysterious beneficiary of Beethoven’s will.

Kingdom of Heaven (2005) – In 1100’s France, a village blacksmith joins a Baron’s company on their way to fight in the crusades. In Jerusalem, he leads the Christians in a heroic defense of city against Saladin. [A possible question for young viewers would be “Why does a man who is knighted fight better than one who is not?”]

The Messenger (1999) –  In early 1400’s France, the country was simultaneously fighting a civil war, and a war against invading English.  It was during this time Jeanne d’Arc (Joan of Arc) was born into a devout peasant family.  She had her first vision of St. Michael at age 13, and told by God she would help defeat the English. Through her faith, she won support from the future king and his troops.  She led successful battles until her capture by the rival Burgundians, and their sale of her to the English, who had her burned at the stake for heresy. 

Zulu (1964) – In the late 1800’s, the British Empire pushed aggressively into Boer and Zulu territory. Due to mistakes in leadership, the British suffered defeat at the battle of Isandlwana (1879). A force of Zulu split from that battle then attacked a tiny British mission at Rorke’s Drift. The soldiers’ survival depended on their courage and military discipline. 

Sport

Miracle (2004) –  The 1960 Olympic gold in men’s hockey was won by the USA. Herb Brooks was the last player cut from the squad before the games started. Twenty years later, he was given the chance to be part of team USA again. Using his knowledge of psychology, the Soviet stating system, he crafts a team out of bickering rivals that can match up against the nearly unbeatable Soviet hockey team.

Rocky (1976) – A small time boxer is given a chance to fight the heavyweight champion.  Although he feels he has no chance of winning, he wants to go all 15 rounds to prove his worthiness. In order to achieve his goal, he’ll have to stay in the fight, no matter the punishment he receives. 

Rocky II (1979) – After the title fight between Rocky and Apollo Creed, Rocky retires from boxing, while Creed receives “hate mail” for his less-than-stellar performance. Creed begins a campaign to publicly insult Rocky, until he and his trainer, Micky, decide to answer Creed’s challenge (over his wife’s strong objections). 

Hoosiers (1986) – Based on the 1954 Indiana state basketball champs. The film follows an unconventional high school basketball coach who stresses fitness, fundamentals and discipline in order for his team to achieve success against bigger, more athletic teams. 

American Anthem (1986) – Hotshot gymnast Steve Tevere has given up on his gymnastics career since an accident. While keeping tabs on the local team, he spies a beautiful woman that has flown in to train with them. She rekindles his interest in the sport, and they train for Olympic trials. [It’s a bit cheesy, but young gymnastics fans will love the movie.]

Male Role Models

The Quiet Man (1952) – Sean Thornton (John Wayne) returns to his native Ireland to buy back his family’s farm. He falls in love with Mary Kate Danaher (Maureen O’Hara), which complicates his acquisition, since his soon-to-be brother-in-law also wants to buy the same property. The movie has charm that is very seldom seen in modern films.

Doctor No (1962) – James Bond (Sean Connery) is sent to Jamaica to investigate the source of radio jamming, which has been targeting NASA launches from Cape Canaveral. Along the way, he meets Honey Ryder (Ursula Andress) and attempts to thwart the plans of Dr. No.

Crocodile Dundee (1985) – An American jouralist is sent by her editor/boyfriend to Austrailia to write a story about Mick Dundee, who scrapped with a crocodile and came out on top. Mick shows her the territory he calls home, and she invites him back to New York City to continue her story on him. Once back in the big city, she must decide between her Jewish editor, and a real man from Australia’s Northern Territory.

Conan the Barbarian (1982) – After the Secret of Steel  is passed on to the young Conan by his father, their village is attacked, young Conan is taken captive and his parents are slaughtered by the army of Thulsa Doom (James Earle Jones). Conan (Arnold Schwarzenegger) grows up as a slave, then later forced to fight as a gladiator. After a captor sets him free, he embarks on a relentless mission to kill Thulsa Doom.   [Based on the character of Robert E. Howard]

Soldier (1998) – A government program selects babies at birth and trains them as life-long soldiers. Eventually, another program creates a new “perfect” squad of soldiers by manipulating DNA. Sgt. Todd (Kurt Russell) is cast out as refuse, as he and the original squad are replaced.  Sgt. Todd eventually finds himself protecting a small community abandoned on a remote planet from the “perfect” new soldiers. [This film will especially resonate with boys and young men who have come to feel ostracized from society.]

Gladiator (2001) – During a Germanic campaign of 180 AD, Commodus (Joaquin Phoenix), the corrupt son of Emperor Marcus Aurelius (Richard Harris), kills his father and moves against the loyal General Maximus (Russell Crowe). Maximus escapes, but is later captured by slavers and sold in gladiator combat in North Africa. He eventually wins in combat in Rome, and comes face-to-face with Commodus. 

Troy (2004) – Loosely based on The Iliad, the film tells the story of a negotiated peace between Sparta and Troy – broken by the spoiled Paris – who takes the wife of Sparta’s king back to Troy with him. Several Greek city-states retaliate by embarking on a campaign to destroy Troy. [Young viewers should observe how the decisions of the main characters affect those around them: the selfish and cowardly Paris, the brazen, super-human Achilles, and the noble, responsible Hector.]

300 (2006) – In 480 BC, the Greek world was undergoing a second invasion from the Persian Empire.  In order buy time for city-states to prepare, King Leonidas of Sparta marched 300 of his personal guard 120 miles north to the defensible choke point called Thermopylae to take on the Persian army. Even though the film presents events in comic-book style, the Spartan ethos is faithfully represented.

Insightful

Fight Club (1999) – The complexity and significance of the film is impossible to summarize. The Narrator (Ed Norton), who is frustrated with his superficial life of material goods – meets Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt) – who shows him how to disregard what is unimportant and become free in all the ways he’s been afraid to.  [Based on the novel by Chuck Palahniuk]

Groundhog Day (1993) –  The cynical weatherman, Phil Connors (Bill Murray), is sent to a small town to cover a traditional ceremony on Groundhog’s Day. He finds himself trapped there; always reliving the same day. While struggling with his predicament at first, he finally surrenders to his fate, turning his attention to self improvement and helping others.

Wag the Dog (1997) – A US president is caught in inappropriate behaviour weeks before voting day. Knowing the public is easily manipulated, a political fixer (Robert DeNiro) sets out to create a diversion that distracts from the president’s actions. He hires a Hollywood producer (Dustin Hoffman) to “produce” a virtual war. As problems with the ruse arise, the producer deftly alters the production to insure the public continues believing the lie.

Romance

Emma (1996) –  In the early 1800s England, young Emma Woodhouse fancies herself a romantic matchmaker. She stumbles in her attempts due to her naivete, and finds true love where she did not expect it.   [Based on Emma by Jane Austen]

Sense and Sensibility (1995)  – When their father dies, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood are forced out of their home and reduced to a small inheritance.  They both find love, and regain financially security once again.  [Based on Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen]

Pride and Prejudice (2005) – A family of five daughters from the gentry class of England take part in the courtship rituals befitting their station in life.  The man Elizabeth Bennet dislikes becomes the one she chooses to marry. No one could have seen that coming. [Based on Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen]

Gone with the Wind (1939) – Scarlett O’Hara lives an idyllic life on a cotton plantation at the start of the War for Southern Independence. The man she loves marries another; she then spends several years making marriage decisions for selfish reasons. Rhett Butler, on the perimeter of her life, often expresses his interest, but never fails to chastise her for her selfish behaviour. Eventually, the timing is right for them to come together, but that doesn’t mean they live happily ever after.

Roman Holiday (1953) – During her country’s official visit to Rome, Princess Ann escapes from her country’s delegation to enjoy the freedom of anonymity. An American newspaper reporter helps her out of a bind, and the two spend time together enjoy the attractions of the city.

Science Fiction- story, setting biospirit projected into future settings

Star Wars (1977) – [In the days before George Lucas became fat and complacent, he had a vision to meld a classical hero’s journey, a western, and a space opera. He stayed true to his vision, creating this monumental film.] Moisture farmer Luke Skywalker longs to leave his boring desert planet and become a pilot in the imperial academy.  What he gets is beyond his dreams – as two droids lead him to a war hero living incognito – who then leads him into the very heart of his galaxy’s conflict.

The Empire Strikes Back (1980) – After destruction of the Death Star, the Rebels avoid their own destruction by fleeing their base on Yavin IV and building a new one on the ice planet Hoth. The Empire detects and destroys the base. When the Rebels flee, Han and Leia seek refuge with one of Han’s old friends. Meanwhile, Luke begins Jedi training in earnest with the Jedi Master Yoda. Luke interrupts his training when he realizes his friends’ lives are in danger, and he must decide to continue his training, or leave it incomplete and attempt an impulisve rescue.

Return of the Jedi (1983) – Following defeats handed out by Darth Vader and his military, the Rebels are on the run, but still in the fight. Han Solo’s friends focus on his rescue, the Rebel fleet gathers for an all out attack, and Luke Skywalker is prepared to die in order to challenge both Vader and the Emperor.

Blade Runner (1982) – In an alternate future, engineered humans, called replicants, are created to perform tasks at the behest of humans. Four of them escape from their off-world location and are loose, seeking freedom and a longer life span from their designer. Police, known as blade runners, are tasked with eliminating errant replicants. Rick Deckard is the one ordered to kill the escapees. However, he finds his orders problematic, as the replicants are more human than he could have suspected.   [Based on Philip K. Dick’s book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? ]

Blade Runner 2049 (2017) –  The replicant blade runner, K, eliminates a rogue replicant, and in the process, finds evidence a female replicant may have given birth several years in the past. K’s human boss orders him to find and kill the child, if it exists. During K’s search for the child, his investigation leads him to a retired blade runner, and to the realization he may be the person he’s been ordered to kill.

Holiday

It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) –  George Bailey is a man who consistently puts others first. After a lifetime of selflessly placing his plans on hold, an accident happens that will financially ruin him, and possibly place him in jail. George reaches the end of his rope, and he’s ready to commit suicide. It’s at that point that his guardian angel appears and shows George how he has single-handedly saved his town and saved others’ lives. [One of the most uplifting movies of all time.]

A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965) – Even though it’s Christmas season, Charlie Brown is feeling down. Lucy [Psychiatric Help 5¢] suggests Charlie Brown direct the Christmas play.  Charlie Brown accepts, and while purchasing a tree for the play, he buys the only real one available, instead of the shiny, big fake trees.  The other children mock his tree, but then later realize they were missing the meaning of Christmas, while Charlie Brown understood it all along.

Emmet Otter’s Jug-Band Christmas (1977) – Poor little Emmet Otter and his Ma scrape by, by taking any work they can find in Frogtown Hollow. In the hopes of buying the other one a present, they each secretly enter a talent contest, with the hope of winning the prize money. Ma has a song picked out, and Emmet Otter forms his jug band, but the Riverbottom Nightmare Band may just upset their plans.

A Christmas Story (1983) – As Christmas approaches, young Ralphie Parker dreams of a Red Ryder BB gun. His hints and requests, directed at both his mother and Santa Claus, are dismissed with, “You’ll shoot your eye out.” Despite his best efforts to be good, he realizes there is no Red Ryder BB gun under the tree come Christmas morning.

Television Programs

Little House on the Prarie (1974) – This series follows the lives of the Ingalls family in 1870s Walnut Grove, Minnesota. [The series is based on the books of Laura Ingalls Wilder] 

Adam-12 (1968) – The patrol duo of Mike Malloy and Jim Reed serve and protect citizens of Los Angeles from the unsavory criminal element.

Emergency! (1972) –  The firefighter-paramedic team of Johnny Gage and Roy DeSoto make up Squad 51 – performing rescue, EMS and firefighter duties (besides being all around good guys).

The Waltons (1972) After the “rural purge” of 1970-1971 by antiwhite TV executives, a backlash from Congress called for more wholesome family-oriented programming. CBS then created The Waltons, and placed it in a time slot where it would fail. However, the show about the Walton family of rural Virginia proved to be an instant hit. 

The Wonder Years (1988) – This series follows Kevin Arnold through his teenage years in a middle class family in 1960s suburbia.

The Carol Burnett Show (1967) – The long running comedy/variety show features recurring sketches such as: The Queen, The Oldest Man, Mrs. Wiggins  and The Family.

Monty Python’s Flying Circus (1969) – Drawing from a solid base of erudition, the troupe created sketches that were both intellectual and absurd; often mocking accepted English society. Taking an original approach to comedy writing, their programs consisted of multiple sketches, sometimes nested within each other and/or segued by bizarre animations. 

Blackadder (1983) –  This series is broken into four time periods:  1) The Black Adder, about Richard IV’s second son Edmund in 1485, 2) Black Adder II, during the reign of Elizabeth I, 3) Black Adder the Third, late 1700s,   4) Blackadder goes Fourth, World War I. For your viewing pleasure and convenience, each time period features an Edmund Blackadder with sidekick Baldric.

Music: Classical

Richard Wagner (1813-1883) German

Siegfried’s Funeral March from Der Ring des Nibelungen

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) German

Turkish March
Symphony No. 5

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) German

Brandenburg Concerto No. 6

Wolfgang Amadeus Motzart (1756-1791) Austrian

Symphony No. 40

Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) German

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) German

William Byrd (1543-1623) English

Nunc Dimittis

Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) Italian

Four Seasons

Johann Strauss II (1825-1899) Austrian

The Blue Danube Waltz

Jean Sibelius (1865-1957) Finnish

Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) Russian

The Nutcracker Suite

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) Russian

The Rite of Spring

Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) Ukrainian

Romeo and Juliet No. 13, Dance of the Knights

Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) French

Bolero

Gustav Holst (1874-1934) English

Mars  from The Planets

Basil Poledouris (1945-2006) American

Conan: Anvil of Crom

John Williams (born 1932) American

Star Wars: Imperial March

Music: Modern Videos

Hrzda : Stephen (2021) – A beautiful slice of the western biospirit – traditional dance, traditional gender roles, in a great (Slovakian) European setting.

Literature

Male Teen

A Princess of Mars (1912) – Capt. John Carter is prospecting in Arizona. While suffering from an attack by Apaches he does not die.  Instead, he feels himself hurled across the void between Earth and Mars. On Barsoom (as it is called by its inhabitants), he quickly earns the respect of a savage tribe (the Tharks) by using his greater speed and strength (being accustomed to Earth’s gravity and atmosphere) to fell mighty opponents. He rescues a princess (Dejah Thoris) from the refined copper-coloured race of Helium, and goes to war with its arch enemy. He lives a happy life until the thin atmosphere of Barsoom runs out of oxygen, resulting in a death that sends him back to Earth. [Edgar Rice Burroughs simultaneously wrote the tales of John Carter and Tarzan. While the epic tales of John Carter meet and exceed those of Tarzan, the highly imaginative setting of Barsoom prohibited the marketing Tarzan received.]

The Gods of Mars (1913) – Returning to Barsoom once more, John Carter finds himself at the south pole of the planet, in the Valley Dor – where the planet’s inhabitants go to die, and no one is allowed to return under punishment of death. He uncovers the secret that both a black race (the First Born) and white race (the Therns) have been running their own cults, necessitating the killing of unsuspecting pilgrims to the valley. He brings the forces of Helium, and the savage Tharks, to finally end the predation practiced by both the Therns and First Born. Before the cult is crushed however, its leader has Dejah Thoris thrown into an inescapable prison.

The Warlord of Mars (1914) – After destroying the city-states running the death cults in the Valley of Dor, Dejah Thoris is kidnapped from her prison and taken north. John Carter battles enemies while in pursuit; until arriving at the planet’s north pole, where a previously unknown yellow race uses a secret technology to capture entire fleets of air ships – and the crews as slaves. John Carter is taken prisoner, but must free himself and free the numerous slave population in revolt. 

Tarzan of the Apes (1912)

Conan (1932) –  In the Hyperborian Age, Conan lived and ruled by his own hand. Straightforward, brutal, with a savage nobility, Conan fights armies, monsters and sorcerers as his travels take him into extraordinary lands and fantastic situations. [Robert E. Howard first published Conan stories in Weird Tales. Howard had 17 stories written and 17 published before his death.] 

Science Fiction

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1979) –  The life of quiet, boring Arthur Dent is changed forever when the bureaucratic Vogons show up and destroy the earth. Luckily, Ford Prefect also arrives to serve as a kooky guide for Arthur through bizarre galactic adventures.   [This book will most likely make you laugh out loud. The other titles in this famous Douglas Adams series are: The Restaurant at the End of the Universe; Life, the Universe and Everything; So Long and Thanks for All the Fish; and Mostly Harmless ]

Classics

The Iliad

Young Female

Little House on the Praire

All Creatures Great and Small

Art

Paintings

Paintings of Westernkind and Western Civilization Part 1 (by FinalBlossom)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7daiICGxqE&t=1350s

60 painters, Adolf Stademann to Frédéric Soulacroix

Paintings of Westernkind and Western Civilization Part 2 (by FinalBlossom)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McgUE7R3m7w&t=2155s   60 painters, Frederick George Cotman to Richard Westall 

Paintings of Westernkind and Western Civilization Part 3 (by FinalBlossom)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7daiICGxqE&t=1350s     

60 painters, Adolph Menzel to Winslow Homer 

Paintings of Westernkind and Western Civilization Part 4 (by FinalBlossom)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7daiICGxqE&t=1350s

 

60 painters, Abraham Govaerts to Vasily Perov

Modern Painting

John Berkey

The Classic Sci-Fi Art of John Berkey

Frank Franzetta

http://frankfrazetta.org/

Boris Vallejo

 

Michael Whelan

Sculptures