Basic

ELa Curriculum

Rule 1: A sentence is a whole thought.

      Grammar Rule 1
      Reading: “Doing My Chores”
      Reading: “A Dog on a Log”
Rule 2: A sentence begins with a capital letter.
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Rule 3: A sentence that tells something needs a period at the end.
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Rule 4: A sentence that asks something needs a question mark at the end.
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Rule 5: The word “I” is always capitalized.
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Rule 6; The names of people and pets begin with capital letters.
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Rule 7: The names of specific places begin with capital letters.
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Rule 8: The names of the months begin with capital letters.
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Rule 9: The names of months begin with capital letters.
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Rule 10: The names of holidays begin with capital letters.
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Rule 11: Some words name things.
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Rule 12: Some words tell what is happening or what already happened.
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Rule 13: Some words take the place of names. These words are called pronouns.
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Rule 14: A contraction is a short way to write two words.
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Rule 15: A contraction uses an apostrophe.
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Rule 16: Two words can sometimes be put together to make a new word. These words are called compound words.
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Rule 17: Use “I” when you are the person doing something. Use me when something happens to you.
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Rule 18: Use “we” when you and other people do something. Use “us” when something happens to you and other people.
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Rule 19: Use “they” when several people do something. Use “them” when something happens to several people.
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Rule 20: Add an “s” to most nouns to name more than one.
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Rule 21: Add an “es” to some nouns to show more than one.
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Rule 22: Use “is” with one and “are” with more than one.
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Rule 23: When something belongs to a person, add “‘s” to the name of the person.
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Rule 24: Some words add “ed” to show that something has already happened.
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Rule 25: Some special words show that something has already happened.
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Rule 1: A sentence expresses a complete thought. Every complete sentence has two parts.

      Grammar Rule 1
      Reading: “Dylan the Dragon”
Rule 2: There are four kinds of sentences. Each kind uses a specific ending punctuation.
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Rule 3: Conjunctions such as “and”, “but” and “or” are used to join words or groups of words.
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Rule 4: Nouns name a person, place, or thing. Some nouns name specific people, places or things.
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Rule 5: Some nouns name only one person, place or thing. Other nouns name more than one.
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Rule 6: To make plural nouns, add “s” or “es”.
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Rule 7: Some nouns have special plural forms. These are called irregular plurals.
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Rule 8: A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
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Rule 9: Name yourself last when you are talking about another person and yourself.
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Rule 10: A possessive noun tells who or what owns something.
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Rule 11: Possessive pronouns tell who or what own something. They replace possessive nouns.
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Rule 12: A verb tells what is happening to the noun.
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Rule 13: The verb in a sentence must agree with the subject of the sentence.
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Rule 14: The tense of a verb tells when an action occurs.
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Rule 15: Use the rules below for present tense verbs when the subject is singular.
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Rule 16: Add “ed” to make the past tense of most verbs.
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Rule 17: Adjectives are words that describe nouns or pronouns.
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Rule 18: Adjectives can make comparisons.
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Rule 19: The words “a”, “an” and “the” are called articles.
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Rule 20: Commas are used to separate three or more words or phrases in a series.
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Rule 21: Commas follow specific rules when used in dates and addresses.
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Rule 22: Commas follow specific rules when used after introductory words and to set off the name of the person being spoken to.
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Rule 23: Commas use specific rules when used in a friendly letter.
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Rule 24: Quotation marks show the exact words of a speaker.
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Rule 25: Use these rules when using the words “can” and “may”.
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Rule 1: There are four kinds of sentences. Each kind requires a specific ending punctuation.
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Rule 2: Every complete sentence has a subject and a predicate.
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Rule 3: Conjunctions are used to join words or groups of words.
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Rule 4: A compound sentence is made by putting together two or more simple sentences containing related information.
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Rule 5: A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.
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Rule 6: Singular nouns name one person, place, thing, or idea. Plural nouns name more than one person, place, thing, or idea.
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Rule 7: A verb is a word in the predicate that tells physical or mental action or a state of being.
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Rule 8: The tense of a verb tells when an action occurs — present, past, or future.
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Rule 9: Endings are added to verbs to change the tense.
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Rule 10: Some verbs do not follow a set rule to form the past tense. These verbs are called irregular verbs.
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Rule 11: There are several types of pronouns.
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Rule 12: The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun or nouns to which the pronoun refers.
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Rule 13: Possessive nouns need an apostrophe. Possessive pronouns do not need an apostrophe.
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Rule 14: Adjectives describe nouns or pronouns.
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Rule 15: Adjectives can make comparisons.
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Rule 16: An adverb is a word that describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.
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Rule 17: Prepositions and prepositional phrases relate a noun or pronoun to another word in the sentence.
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Rule 18: Words in a series and equal adjectives need commas to separate them.
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Rule 19: A comma is used after introductory words and to set off the name of a person being spoken to.
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Rule 20: Commas and colons are used in specific instances.
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Rule 21: Commas set apart an appositive (a word or phrase that renames the noun or pronoun before it) from the rest of the sentence.
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Rule 22: A direct quotation has specific rules of punctuation and capitalization.
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Rule 23: Titles of books, movies, plays, magazines, songs, stories, etc., are treated in specific ways.
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Rule 24: Negative words and the pronouns I, me, they, and them follow specific usage rules.
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Rule 25: Some words are easily confused. Take care to use can/may, “sit/set”, “lie/lay”, and “good/well”.
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Basic

Math Curriculum

Young Elementary Math

Introduction to Addition
     
     Lesson 1: Add to 10 with Images

     Lesson 2: Identify Equal Sums to 20

     Lesson 3: Add Numbers to 100

Introduction to Subtraction
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Counting to 100
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Inequalities
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Telling Time
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Money
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Measurement
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Basic Shapes
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Simple Patterns
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MId Elementary Math

Multiplication (Single Digit)
     
     Lesson 1: Multiplication, Groups and Expressions

     Lesson 2: Multiplication, Groups and Expressions (Part 2)

     Lesson 3: Fact Families

     Lesson 4: Relating Addition and Multiplication

Division (Single Digit)
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Addition (Multi Digit)
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Subtraction (Multi Digit)
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Place Value to 1,000,000
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Time Calculations
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Factors and Multiples
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Rounding Whole Numbers
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2D Shapes: Area and Perimeter
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Arrays
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Long Division (Single Digit Divisor)
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Fraction Equivalence
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Visual Fraction Models
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Measuring Angles
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Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
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Upper Elementary Math

Fractions: Add, Subtract, Multiply, Divide
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Input/Output Tables
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Rounding Decimals
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Decimal, Percent, Fraction Equivalence
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Graphing
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Exponents
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Order of Operations
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Expanded Notation
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Negative Numbers
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Absolute Value
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Probability
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Statistics
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Multi Digit Division
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Ratios and Rates of Change
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3D Shapes: Area, Surface Area, Volume
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Scale Drawings
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Download a sheet for Counting to 100
Download a Multiplication Times Table

Basic

Classes Calendar